IBPSA UK Conference paper (2020)

Conference paper presented in IBPSA-England Building Simulation and Optimisation Conference 2020

Available for download in NUIG repository and Zenodo.

Title: A novel ROM methodology to support the estimation of the energy savings under the Measurement and Verification protocol.

Language: English

Authors: Alessandro Piccinini (*1,2,3), Magdalena Hajdukiewicz (*1,2,3), Letizia D’Angelo (*1,2,3), Luis Miguel
Blanes (*1,2,3), Marcus M. Keane (*1,2,3)

*1: School of Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, National University of Ireland
Galway, Ireland
*2: Informatics Research Unit for Sustainable Engineering (IRUSE) Galway, Ireland
*3: Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland

Abstract: This paper presents a novel Reduced Order grey box Model (ROM) methodology, based on a Resistor-Capacitor (RC) network, which supports the creation of the baseline energy consumption and the estimation of energy savings due to Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) under the Measurement and Verification protocol. Within this scope, a description of the RC network, including a calculation of the parameters’ needed to execute the ROM, are presented. This ROM methodology is demonstrated on an educational building located in Sant Cugat, Spain as part of the H2020 GEOFIT project. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the ROM is sufficiently accurate for the creation of the baseline energy consumption and for estimating the energy savings of different ECMs.

Data in Brief Paper (2020)

Paper published in Data in Brief Journal (2020)

Title: Data collected by coupling fix and wearable sensors for addressing urban microclimate variability in an historical Italian city

Language: English

Authors: Benedetta Pioppi (*a), Ilaria Pigliautile (*a), Anna Laura Pisello (*a,b)

*a: CIRIAF – Interuniversity Research Centre on Pollution and Environment Mauro Felli, Perugia, Italy
*b: Department of Engineering, Perugia, Italy

Abstract: This article presents the data collected through an extensive research work conducted in a historic hilly town in central Italy during the period 2016-2017. Data concern two different datasets: long-term hygrothermal histories collected in two specific positions of the town object of the research, and three environmental transects collected following on foot the same designed path at three different time of the same day, i.e. during a heat wave event in summer. The short-term monitoring campaign is carried out by means of an innovative wearable weather station specifically developed by the authors and settled upon a bike helmet. Data provided within the short-term monitoring campaign are analysed by computing the apparent temperature, a direct indicator of human thermal comfort in the outdoors. All provided environmental data are geo-referenced. These data are used in order to examine the intra-urban microclimate variability. Outcomes from both long- and short-term monitoring campaigns allow to confirm the existing correlation between the urban forms and functionalities and the corresponding local microclimate conditions, also generated by anthropogenic actions. In detail, higher fractions of built surfaces are associated to generally higher temperatures as emerges by comparing the two long-term air temperature data series, i.e. temperature collected at point 1 is higher than temperature collated at point 2 for the 75% of the monitored period with an average of þ2.8 [1]C. Furthermore, gathered environmental transects demonstrate the high variability of the main environmental parameters below the Urban Canopy. Diversification of the urban thermal behaviour leads to a computed apparent temperature range in between 33.2 [1]C and 46.7 [1]C at 2 p.m. along the monitoring path. Reuse of these data may be helpful for further investigating interesting correlations among urban configuration, anthropogenic actions and microclimate variables affecting outdoor comfort. Additionally, the proposed dataset may be compared to other similar datasets collected in other urban contexts around the world. Finally, it can be compared to other monitoring methodologies such as weather stations and satellite measurements available in the location at the same time.

D4.1 – Options and selections of heating/cooling components for geothermal retrofitting

This report provides description of the modelling work conducted on the pilot sites of Perugia and Sant Cugat. The pilot sites, the studied heating and cooling systems and the used modelling software are described. Suggested low temperature heating and high temperature cooling system designs are simulated and in the case of Sant Cugat, the results are compared with the current situation and a comparable alternative. The results are presented and discussed.

In the pilot site Perugia, the model was created to be used as a design tool by other partners in the project. In the pilot site Sant Cugat, the simulations show that for the primary school a low temperature heating system coupled with mechanical ventilation would improve indoor air quality with heating demand similar to the current system. For the sports pavilion a clear preference could not be established. The results also show that a high temperature cooling system would be a viable alternative for the administrative building and drastically reduce thermal discomfort. Finally, it was found that a comparative state-of-the-art all-air system that would achieve similar comfort would result in higher heating and cooling demand in all cases. The future works in this task will include work on the Aran Islands pilot.

BS Rome – IBPSA Paper (2019)

Presentation of GEOFIT at BS ROME – 16th IBPSA International COnference and Exhibition (2019)

Title: Environmental sustainability and Energy Efficiency in Historical Buildings: GeoFit Project Implementation in the Case Study of a medieval fortress in Perugia

Language: English

Authors: Jessica Romanelli (*1), Matteo Di Grazia(*1), Cristina Piselli (*1,2), Anna Laura Pisello (*1,2), Franco Cotana (*1,2)

*1: CIRIAF – Interuniversity Research Centre, University of Perugia, Italy
*2: Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, Italy

Abstract: Italian cities are mainly constituted by buildings constructed until the mid-20th century by pre-industrial construction techniques. A HVAC system for the energy retrofit of historical buildings is evaluated when applied in the case study of Sant’Apollinare. It consists of a ground source heat pump a water tank for thermal energy storage connected to a low-temperature radiant system and air handling unit. The building thermal-energy behavior, typically influenced by thermal inertia in historical buildings, and the novel HVAC system performance interactions are comparatively assessed together with more traditional scenarios. Energy demand decreases by about one third compared to the pre-retrofit situation.