Environmental Approach of an Enhanced Geothermal System for Energy Efficient Building Retrofitting in a Decentralized Context

Conference paper presented in European Geothermal Congress 2022 held in Berlin, 17-21 October

Title: Environmental Approach of an Enhanced Geothermal System for Energy Efficient Building Retrofitting in a Decentralized Context

Language: English

Authors: Ewa Alicja Zukowska (*1), Maria Parascanu(*1), Henrikki Pieskä (*2), Jose Jorge Espi Gallart (*1), Frederic Clarens Blanco (*1), Marco Calderoni (*3), Qian Wang (*2, 4)

*1: Eurecat, Centre Tecnològic de Catalunya
*2: Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
*3: R2M Solution s.r.l

*4: Uponor AB

Abstract: The life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodology for assessing environmental impacts associated with the stages of the life cycle (LC) of a product, process, or service. This paper compares the results of the entire LCA (cradle-to-grave analysis) of a hybrid heating geothermal system that includes a novel hybrid heat pump 8kW and set of heating components integrated with the novel ground source heat pump (GSHP) concept which was installed in a building located in the Aran Islands (Ireland) within the framework of the H2020 GEOFIT project against the heating system, that existed before the retrofitting. The building selected for the demonstration had in its original version a 21kW diesel boiler (Firebird model S/90) used for heating and an emission system based on 9 radiators with individual on / off control located in different rooms, as well as a coal stove in the living room.
To determine the heat energy of the building before and after the retrofitting, simulations of the heat energy were carried out with the IDA Indoor Climate and Energy 4.8 simulation software, and the SimaPro v.9.1 program was used to calculate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The results show that a new heating system (after GEOFIT) is better alternative than conventional one (before GEOFIT), mainly in terms of generating more heat with less heating energy consumption during the operation stage.
The new system can reduce annual operational emissions by more than 53% in comparison to the reference one.

Techno-Economic Analysis of a Swimming Pool Heating System Retrofitting Through a Dual Source Heat Pump

Conference paper presented in European Geothermal Congress 2022 held in Berlin, 17-21 October

Title: Techno-Economic Analysis of a Swimming Pool Heating System Retrofitting Through a Dual Source Heat Pump

Language: English

Authors: Giuseppe Edoardo Dino (*1), Valeria Palomba (*1), Andrea Frazzica (*1), Adriaan Brebels (*2), Marco Calderoni (*3) and Luis Miguel Blanes Restoy (*4)

*1: CNR ITAE
*2: i.LECO NV
*3: R2M Solution s.r.l

*4: National University of Ireland Galway

Abstract: The European energy policies are aiming to the electrification of the heating sector as it is considered one of the solutions indicated for the decarbonization of the energy system. Heat pumps represent the most promising and widely adopted solution. However, there are some inherent technological problems to heat pumps, such as evaporator frosting for air-source heat pumps and ground thermal drift for ground source heat pumps. From this perspective a dual-source (air-geothermal) heat pumps represents a promising solution to overcome those challenges. GEOFIT H2020 project aims at developing a wide range of smart solutions for the retrofitting of thermal systems based on shallow and deep geothermal source. In this paper, the retrofitting of a gas boiler based system for the heating of a swimming pool in Galway (Ireland) with a dual-source heat pump with active regeneration of the soil is presented. Firstly, a swimming pool model developed in TRNSYS environment was validated through experimental campaign data retrieved by the Galway demo site. The baseline system composed by a gas boiler was simulated, then a reference retrofit solution composed by a dual source heat pump and an analogous system with a reduced design size were proposed and simulated for a long-term period (20 years). The analysis showed that a relevant primary energy saving is achievable and that the ground thermal drift is mitigated through the active ground heat regeneration. The techno-economic analysis revealed that the proposed system could have a replicability in retrofit solutions, especially in those with a seasonal inbalance where only heating loads are required during the whole year. Considering the current and foreseen increase of the fossil fuel costs, the economic competitiveness will be more favourable.